Past Exhibitions

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Lou Stovall: On Inventions and Color

February 1– April 30, 2022

Stovall has been based in Washington since 1962, when he arrived as an undergraduate to study at Howard University. Born in Athens, GA and raised in Springfield, MA, Stovall found his home in DC and his devotion to printmaking, which continues to this day. In 1968, he founded Workshop, Inc., a screenprinting studio aimed to reach new audiences, connect with political movements, and create new opportunities for a diverse group of artists, such as Elizabeth Catlett, Gene Davis, Sam Gilliam, Loïs Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, and Robert Mangold. These important collaborations will be represented in the show, which features works by Gilliam, Jones, and Lawrence, among others. A catalogue will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Lou Stovall, Sundrinkers are we...the forest, the trees., 1971, screenprint, 40 x 26 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Curated by Danielle O’Steen, Ph.D.

Download the catalogue essay and conversation with Stovall 

Audio Label Descriptions


Curator's Talk with Danielle O'Steen on Master Printmaker Lou Stovall​

Lou Stovall a 1983 Film by Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum


 

Of the Land: Lou Stovall and the Poetry of Seasons

February 1 –April 30, 2022


 
Organized to accompany Lou Stovall: On Inventions and Color, this exhibition examines the master printmaker’s 1974 series Of the Land, a collection of interconnected poems, drawings, and prints inspired by the natural world. Guest curated by Will Stovall, the artist’s son and a painter, the show will coincide with a new publication on the series by Georgetown University Press.

Lou Stovall, An Exanthema of Clouds, 1974, 26 x 26 inches, Courtesy of the artist.

Guest curated by Will Stovall
 

The Collaborative | Hoesy Corona

December 1, 2021 - March 19, 2022


Image Credit: Anne Kim

Weathering is an installation that brings together a collection of Climate Ponchos– wearable sculptures used in the ongoing performance series Climate Immigrants (2017-present). In it the performers wear Climate Ponchos adorned with images that depict various archetypal travelers. The series expands upon issues of immigration by implicating everyone and not just a select group, addressing one of the most pressing topics of our time: climate-triggered immigration in relation to US-centric xenophobia. The Climate Ponchos are paired with a new series of sculpted heads entitled The Plant People (2021), a mixed media sculptural series utilizing familiar objects with unique handmade elements to depict the blooming heads of The Plant People, a fictional group of cultural influencers who see themselves as stewards of the earth. Weathering considers the plight of climate induced global migration and its effects on people of color and the population at large. In Weathering the artist utilizes pervasive and harmful materials currently in heavy circulation across the world in the form of fossil fuel derived plastics not unlike those found in our quotidian lives including in our homes, plumbing, bank cards, food containers, clothing, and even photographic records. Weathering warns us of idly waiting out the storm as we continue to be worn down by long exposure to the atmosphere. The works on view highlight the artist’s interest in fabulating and remixing mythologies to protest our waged war on nature.

www.hoesycorona.com 

Presented in collaboration with The Nicholson Project
 

The Collaborative | Stan Squirewell

August - November 2021

Stan Squirewell is a painter, photographer, installation, and performance artist. Born and raised in Washington, DC in Anacostia's Barry Farm neighborhood, Squirewell established a serious art practice while working from his Harlem-based studio before moving to Louisville, KY where he currently lives and works. His work examines who curates and controls the narratives that become accepted as history; from what perspective is history written, whose stories are told, and whose are neglected?

Stan Squirewell, Tina and Chelsea, 2021, Mixed Media Collage with Carved Shoutouts Sugi Ban Frame, Courtesy of the Artist

www.stansquirewell.com

Presented in collaboration with The Nicholson Project
 

Objects from the Studio: The Sculptor’s Process

June 1 - September 30, 2021

This exhibition brings together maquettes, sketches, and other objects from sculptors’ studios to explore how outdoor sculptures are made, focusing on works from The Kreeger Museum’s Sculpture Garden. The show offers insight into the artistic process, from preliminary drawings to handcrafted models. Artists include Kendall Buster, Richard Deutsch, John L. Dreyfuss, Carol Brown Goldberg, Dalya Luttwak, and Foon Sham.

Foon Sham, Sketch C for Revolve, 2008, Pencil on tracing paper

Curated by Danielle O'Steen, Ph.D.

TRACES

Extended through June 30, 2021

The Kreeger Museum is pleased to present TRACES, an exhibition featuring regional artists Billy Friebele, Roxana Alger Geffen, Rania Hassan, Sebastian Martorana, Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Antonio McAfee, Brandon Morse, and Johab Silva. Guest curated by Sarah Tanguy, the show explores how the past evokes shifting memories while suggesting new and present narratives. Rich in representation and abstraction, TRACES encompasses painting, photography, mixed media, sculpture, sound, and video, and includes several site-responsive installations. As the artists dialogue with their source materials, they mine the many meanings of “trace” as noun and verb, and engage the themes of displacement, connectivity and transformation. Variously inspired by personal and cultural history, the natural and built environments, and the human condition, they offer an impassioned take on the issues of the day and suggest possible futures to come. 

Antonio McAfee, The Gem, 2019, Pigment print, 42 x 57 3/4 in., Edition: 1 of 5 + A.P., Courtesy of the artist

In the Press

"The Kreeger Museum has reopened, with an art exhibition that probes the vestiges of the past"
Washington Post, April 13, 2021


Digital Exhibition Catalogue

Reinstallation of the Permanent Collection

The Kreeger Museum’s Postwar and Contemporary art holdings return to the lower level galleries, including works by five Washington-based artists: William Christenberry, Gene Davis, Sam Gilliam, Willem de Looper, and Paul Reed. The lower galleries also highlight the Museum’s outstanding collection of African masks.

Paul Reed, 29, 1965, Acrylic on canvas, Gift of Joan Reed Roberts in memory of Esther K. Reed


 

Charles Hinman: Structures, 1965–2014

Charles Hinman is a New York-based abstract painter who pioneered three-dimensional, shaped canvases starting in the 1960s. This is the first museum show of works by Hinman in the Washington area and the first survey in more than 30 years. Hinman is best known for his compositions that emerge from the wall in a collection of hand-built and multicolored planes, expanding the conventional space of the canvas. Guest curated by Danielle O’Steen, the exhibition offers a look at 50 years of the artist’s innovative work.
Charles Hinman, Sails, 1965, Acrylic on shaped canvas, 34 x 36 x 6 1/2 inches, The Kreeger Museum.​
 

Recent Gifts from the Corcoran Gallery of Art

Recent Gifts from the Corcoran Gallery of Art introduces several works given to The Kreeger Museum as part of the Corcoran Collection Distribution. The addition of these works to the Permanent Collection adds depth to the narrative of modern American painting and sculpture in the 20th Century and Contemporary Galleries.

Joan Mitchell, Untitled, 1965, Gift of the Trustees of the Corcoran Gallery of Art


 

Reinstallation of the Permanent Collection: Phase I

Guest curated by modern art historian Harry Cooper, the reinstallation introduces works that have not been on view for several years, while offering fresh perspectives on collection favorites.
Phase I of the reinstallation, which opened September 19, 2017, comprises the Museum’s main floor galleries and focuses on 19th- and early 20th-century painting and works on paper. Objects on view for the first time in several years include an early portrait by Edvard Munch, two winter landscapes by Impressionist painter Alfred Sisley, a mature pastoral scene by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and a signature Surrealist landscape by French painter Yves Tanguy.

Image: 
Edvard Munch, Klemens Stang with Hat Seated on the Veranda, 1886, oil on canvas, on panel, 12 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, The Kreeger Museum.
 

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